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Archival News 54.1 (Fall 2014)
Edited by Katherine Groo


 

1. PRESERVATION

100 Year-Old Sherlock Holmes Found at Cinémathèque Française

100 Year-Old Sherlock Holmes Found at Cinémathèque Française

At the start of October, the Cinémathèque Française announced that a nearly 100-year-old silent film version of Sherlock Holmes starring Holmes thespian and American actor William Gillette had been discovered at the French film archive. The rediscovered film is the only one Gillette ever appeared in, and is the actor’s only surviving appearance as the Baker Street detective, a role for which he was world-renowned in stage portrayals. Arthur Berthelet directed the film for Essanay Studios in 1916.

A nitrate dupe negative of the film is undergoing digital restoration through a partnership between the Cinémathèque Française and the San Francisco Silent Film Festival. The restoration is also made possible by the financial support of private individuals from the United States and the United Kingdom. The restored film will premiere at Toute la Mémoire du Monde, the Cinémathèque Française’s film restoration festival, in January 2015. It will see its U.S. debut at the San Francisco Silent Film Festival in May 2015.

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Scientists Search for Cecil B. DeMille’s Sphinx

Scientists Search for Cecil B. DeMille’s Sphinx

Archaeologists have begun searching for long-lost set pieces built for Cecil B. DeMille’s The Ten Commandments (1923) and buried by the sands of the Guadalupe-Nipomo dunes. Somewhere in the desert, more than twenty-one giant plaster sphinxes line a path to an 800-foot temple. The set was too expensive to move and too valuable to leave for rival filmmakers to poach — so DeMille had it pushed into a trench and buried.

Archaeologists hope to preserve the props they find and put them on display at the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center. 

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2. LEGAL

Columbia’s Kernochan Center Hosts Copyright Symposium

Columbia’s Kernochan Center Hosts Copyright Symposium

On October 10, 2014, Columbia University’s Kernochan Center for Law, Media, and the Arts hosted "Creation is Not Its Own Reward: Making Copyright Work for Authors and Performers," a symposium dedicated to the United States’ ongoing review of the Copyright Act, with a focus on the concerns of professional artists and performers. Participants in the symposium discussed what changes to the law would most benefit authors and encourage creativity.A complete schedule of events and speakers can be found here. Documents related to the event are available for download here. A summary of the day’s activities can be read here.

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US Hearing on Copyright Act; Oversight of US Copyright Office

US Hearing on Copyright Act; Oversight of US Copyright Office

On September 17, 2014, the United States Congressional Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet continued its comprehensive review of the Copyright Act with a look at Chapter 12, a relatively recent addition to Title 17 that addresses technological protection measures, or TPMs.

When the DMCA was enacted, there was significant concern that the digitization of the US economy would result in mass piracy for many copyright owners. TPMs were intended to enable copyright owners to engage in self-help to protect their works from theft. While some view TPMs as an effective tool to thwart piracy, others argue that they have simply been ineffective. Copyright owners themselves have reevaluated the need for TPMs. For example, the music industry has in recent years turned away from widespread use of TPMs.

A complete witness list is available here, along with links to video of the hearing.

On September 18, 2014, the subcommittee heard testimony from Maria Pallante, the Register of Copyrights and the Director of US Copyright Office, on the oversight of the US Copyright Office. Video of the hearing and the full text of Pallante’s testimony can be found here.

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3. INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANIZATIONS

Artists Take Inspiration from BBC Archive

Artists Take Inspiration from BBC Archive

Six artists have created new moving-image artworks, taking the vast BBC film archive as inspiration. The artworks are the result of a residency program that took place over a span of six months at BBC Scotland. During the residency, the selected artists were offered unprecedented access to the UK broadcaster's facilities and archives.

The artists—Kate Davis, Kathryn Elkin, Luke Fowler, Torsten Lauschmann, Stephen Sutcliffe, and Alia Syed—began their research earlier this year. The resulting short films were screened last week at CCA Glasgow and Tate Modern in London, as part of Tate’s “TV as Material” weekend.

The short films are now available to view online on the BBC website. Although the works offer a diverse range of approaches, they all seem to share an interest in how the medium of television has shaped our understanding of art and culture.

The residency, Artists and Archives: Artists' Moving Image at the BBC, was one of several new projects developed as part of an ongoing commitment by the BBC to allow artists access to its archives.

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Pathé Opens New Film Center in Paris

Pathé Opens New Film Center in Paris

In September 2014, the Jérôme Seydoux-Pathé Foundation opened in Paris, housed in a building designed by world-famous architect, Renzo Piano. The Foundation will showcase the development of cinema through the history of the Pathé film company, which was established in 1896 by Emile and Charles Pathé. It was the biggest film company in the world until World War I.

Showcasing silent cinema will be a key priority. The Foundation boasts Europe’s first silent-film only cinema, a 70-seater screening room, equipped with two 35mm Kinoton projectors and a black piano at the foot of the screen. To accompany the screenings with music, the Foundation has partnered with pianist Jean-François Zygel.

The Foundation’s top floor houses a research center, which will allow film historians and students access to Pathé’s archives. Pathé is the oldest film company in the world to have always archived all its records, without any interruption, from its first board meeting’s minutes.

More details available here and here.

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International Celebrations of Home Movies; Audiovisual Heritage

International Celebrations of Home Movies; Audiovisual Heritage

Peanuts At The Park - March 20, 2010 from Schnoidz Pigister on Vimeo.

On October 18, the twelfth annual Home Movie Day was celebrated by the Center for Home Movies and by communities around the world. Home Movie Day is a celebration of amateur films and filmmaking. The event teaches individuals and families how best to care for their films and gives them an opportunity to screen their home movies, and watch those that others have brought along.

Read more about the event here and here.

On October 27, the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) celebrated the World Day for Audiovisual Heritage. Annually, archives around the world join together on this date to celebrate audiovisual archives with activities that not only highlight the vulnerability of this heritage, but also to acknowledge the work of the heritage institutions that protect it. This year’s theme was “Archives at Risk: Much More To Do.”

The General Conference first approved the commemoration of a World Day for Audiovisual Heritage in 2005 as a mechanism to raise general awareness of the need for urgent measures to be taken and to acknowledge the importance of audiovisual documents as an integral part of national identity.

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BFI Offers Major Film Digitization Fund

BFI Offers Major Film Digitization Fund

 

In September, the British Film Institute (BFI) began accepting applications for its Unlocking Film Heritage Digitisation Fund. Holders of important British film and television items can apply for funding for digitization, though only films and television titles originated on film are eligible. Five million pounds is available over a three-year period through an award of National Lottery funding. This fund was established in 2013 and has already seen colleague archives and specialist collections undertake new programs of work and digitization.

The BFI aims to fund the digitization of 10,000 titles. The projects will be divided into separate strands: 5,000 from the BFI National Archive; and 5,000 from significant public collections and rights- holders’ collections in the United Kingdom. The priority for this phase of the project is to find films that (1) meet criteria of public and cultural value, (2) have a strong audience appeal, and (3) make a contribution to a series of curatorial themes. The BFI is particularly interested in films that explore Britain on Film, or feature key anniversaries, seasonal and regional festivals, customs, and/or events.

More information can be found at the BFI.

[Above: Image from Peddlers’ Progress(1949); Scottish Screen Archive]

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LoC Mandates Preservation Project for US Radio History

LoC Mandates Preservation Project for US Radio History

The Library of Congress’s (LoC) National Recording Preservation Board has mandated a national preservation project for U.S. radio history, called the "Radio Preservation Task Force" (RPTF). The RPTF seeks (a) to develop a comprehensive national inventory of existing archival collections with significant holdings of American radio program recordings and supporting documentation; (b) to encourage the development of additional archival efforts such as digitization, online access, and metadata analytics; (c) identify gaps in currently known or available collections to help focus further preservation and archiving efforts; and (d) to make the results of the Task Force’s findings publicly accessible in order to promote the use of radio-based recorded sound as a research and educational resource.

The task force project director is Christopher H. Sterling, associate dean at George Washington University; more than 90 faculty members from across the United States are currently participating in the project.

Further details on the project and possibilities for participation can be found here.

 

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Kodak Gifts Digital Lab to George Eastman House

Kodak Gifts Digital Lab to George Eastman House

At the end of September, George Eastman House announced that it will operate a digital laboratory as part of its Moving Image Department, thanks to Eastman Kodak Company’s donation of digital equipment. The gift will enhance George Eastman House’s in-house capabilities in film preservation, allowing broader access to the museum’s motion picture collection. The lab will be used for both digitizing select titles from the museum’s premier collection of more than 28,000 films, as well as preserving digitally-born works.

As George Eastman House gradually increases the number of titles from its collection available in both film and digital formats, the digital laboratory will enable screening venues to choose the medium in which they prefer to exhibit these works from the museum’s collection. “Motion picture film remains the best and most durable carrier of moving images. Cinema has thrived for over 120 years in photochemical form, and our museum is committed to preserving and presenting it as such for posterity,” said Paolo Cherchi Usai, senior curator, Moving Image Department, George Eastman House. “Film and digital are different media—each with its own merits. Our institution embraces their coexistence as powerful tools for creativity and knowledge. Our investment in the digital future will be as steadfast as our passion for cinema as an art form.”

The George Eastman House digital laboratory will be available to the museum’s partner archives and museums. The lab will also allow digital restoration to become a major component of the curriculum in the L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film Preservation, the museum’s certificate and graduate program in partnership with the University of Rochester.

More information is available from the George Eastman House.

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In Memoriam: Mary Lea Bandy (1942-2014)

In Memoriam: Mary Lea Bandy (1942-2014)

Mary Lea Bandy, a film preservationist and former director of the film department at the New York Museum of Modern Art, died last month at the age of seventy-one. Born in Evanston, Illinois, on June 16, 1943, Bandy studied art history at Stanford University before moving to New York in 1965 for graduate studies at Columbia University. Bandy became director of the film department in 1980 and also served as chief curator of film at the museum starting in 1994 until her retirement in 2006. During her tenure there, she expanded the museum’s collection and oversaw the construction of the Celeste Bartos Film Preservation Center in Hamlin, PA, which stores MoMA’s film archive of nearly thirty thousand titles, additional duplicates, and millions of still photographs.

See Artforum and the NYTimes for more on Bandy’s life and work.

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4. EXHIBITIONS

2014 Pordenone Silent Film Festival

2014 Pordenone Silent Film Festival

The thirty-third annual Pordenone Silent Film Festival was held from October 4–11, 2014. This year’s event was dedicated to Peter von Bagh (1943-2014), the co-founder of the Midnight Sun Film Festival and the creative director of the Cinema Ritrovato Film Festival, who died earlier this year.

The festival’s thematic strands included “The Barrymores” (screenings dedicated to the silent-era work of the Barrymore acting family); “The Dawn of Technicolor”; “Early Japanese Cinema”; “Ukrainian Animation”; and the early cinema of Paul Nadar, Georges Méliès, and Frank Ormiston-Smith (among others). The festival also included special screenings of The Immigrant (Charles Chaplin, 1917) and City Lights (Charles Chaplin, 1930); Ben Hur: A Tale of Christ (Fred Niblo, 1925); and Die Nibelungen (Fritz Lang, 1924).

For a complete schedule of the events, see here. For reflections from one of the festival’s attendees, see Charles Musser.

[Above: Frame enlargement from 35mm nitrate Technicolor dye-transfer print of Manchu Love (Elmer Clifton, US 1929). The film was preserved by George Eastman House and screened in the “Dawn of Technicolor” series at the Pordenone festival. George Eastman House / Gift of Alan D. Kattelle]

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MoMA Premieres Lost Landmark of Black Cinema; Bill Morrison De-Compositions

MoMA Premieres Lost Landmark of Black Cinema; Bill Morrison De-Compositions

At the end of October, 2014, the Museum of Modern Art in New York opened a new exhibition entitled, “100 Years in Post-Production: Resurrecting a Lost Landmark of Black Cinema.” The exhibition celebrates the recent restoration of seven reels of Lime Kiln Field Day (1913), the earliest-surviving footage of a feature film with a black cast and an interracial production team. The film also features Bert Williams, the first black Broadway star, and includes rare behind-the-scenes interactions between the actors and the production team. Stills and excerpts will be shown at the exhibition; the full sixty-minute restoration will be screened at the museum’s “To Save and Project” festival dedicated to film preservation.

The reels were part of a collection of 900 unprinted negatives that came from the defunct Biograph Company in New York. Iris Barry, MoMA’s founding film curator, acquired the cache, including the untitled Williams material, in 1939. Its journey to the public began in 1976, when a curator copying the footage noted Bert Williams’s appearance. In 2004, Mr. Magliozzi’s curatorial team began restoring the film and researching its origins. The team showed the material to experts and combed through old trade papers to identify the actors and directors. Comparisons were made between screen images and those on sheet music and old press photos. MoMA hired a lip reader to watch scenes for clues.

Read more at the NYTimes.

In October, the MoMA also hosted a live collaborative performance by Bill Morrison and DJ Olive. Morrison projected a selection of clips from his archive—including excerpts from his films as well as previously unscreened sequences—while DJ Olive created a live soundtrack. This unique improvisational film performance, which the filmmaker has titled De-Compositions, deconstructs the typical film going experience, immersing the audience in a live interaction between recorded sound and archival image. The event was intended as a preview for another upcoming film exhibition Bill Morrison: Compositions.

[Above: Bert Williams Lime Kiln Field Day Project, via Museum of Modern Art]

 

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Montreal Hosts 12-Hour Metropolis Dance Party

Montreal Hosts 12-Hour Metropolis Dance Party

As part of its twenty-fourth annual “Black & Blue Festival,” the city of Montreal hosted a twelve-hour “silent disco” dance party, which took Fritz Lang’s Metropolis as its inspiration. The event was held at the city’s Palais des congrès. Metropolis played continuously throughout the night and participants had the option of listening to the live music provided by electro-jazz musicians Les Muetants, or listening (via headphones) to the film’s original score. All proceeds from the event went to the BBCM Foundation, whose goal is to financially support Montreal’s AIDS support organizations.

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5. CONFERENCES, SYMPOSIA, AND WORKSHOPS

FIAF Announces Film Preservation and Restoration School in India

FIAF Announces Film Preservation and Restoration School in India

The International Federation of Film Archives (FIAF) recently announced that a weeklong film preservation and restoration school will be hosted at Films Division, Mumbai by the Film Heritage Foundation in collaboration with Martin Scorsese’s Film Foundation, Cineteca di Bologna, and L’Immagine Ritrovata. Classes will be held from February 22–28.

The program’s goal is to address the current issues related to film preservation and restoration while providing participants with practical training in current restoration and archival practices. The school will include lectures, screenings, and practical hands-on training conducted by the staff of the Film Foundation, Fondazione Cineteca di Bologna, L’Immagine Ritrovata, and leading international experts and filmmakers.

The deadline for submitting applications is November 30.

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AMIA Hosts Annual Conference, 8-11 October

AMIA Hosts Annual Conference, 8-11 October

The Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) held its annual conference in Savannah, Georgia on October 8–11. Panel presentations and discussions addressed open source tools; moving image and sound from medical institutions; data loss in an archival environment; and the rise of digital repositories. The conference also featured workshops on small gauge projection and repair; community archiving; and cataloguing and metadata. The first day of the conference included a “Hack Day,” which invited practitioners and managers of audiovisual collections to join with developers and engineers to develop solutions for audiovisual preservation and access.

A full program can be found here.

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Leeds Examines Film Heritage and Preservation, 27 October

Leeds Examines Film Heritage and Preservation, 27 October

On October 27, the School of Media and Communication (SMC) and Cultural & Creative Industries Exchange at the University of Leeds (UK) held its second annual SMC Audiovisual Heritage Meeting in conjunction with the UNESCO World Day for Audiovisual Heritage. The theme for the event was “Values of Film Heritage: defining, Assessing, and Bringing People to Them.” Participants pursued several questions, including: Should policymakers support film heritage preservation and audience development with more conviction? Why does it matter? Why might it be important to systematically integrate archival discourse into Film and Media Studies? And what are the practical initiatives that archives, universities, and policy-makers need to focus on and support? More details and a complete program can be found here.

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6. AWARDS

2014 Avant-Garde Masters Grants Awarded

2014 Avant-Garde Masters Grants Awarded

FF (excerpt) from julie murray on Vimeo.

The Books of Ed Ruscha (Ed Ruscha, ca. 1969), a tongue in cheek “portrait” of the California artist’s own art, along with works by four other filmmakers will be saved through the 2014 Avant-Garde Masters Grants awarded by The Film Foundation and the National Film Preservation Foundation. All told, ten films will be preserved and made available through the 2014 grants.

Also green-lighted for preservation are Globe (Ken Jacobs, 1971); Julie Murray’s FF (1986), Tr’cheot’my P’sy (1988), A Legend of Parts (1988), and Conscious (1993); Tommy Turner’s Simonland (1984) and Rat Trap (1985), his collaboration with Tessa Hughes-Freeland (New York University); and Shirley Clarke’s Butterfly (1967) and 24 Frames Per Second (1977).

Now in its twelfth year, the Avant-Garde Masters Grants is the pioneering program funded by The Film Foundation and managed by the NFPF that saves films significant to the development of the avant-garde in America. The grants have preserved works by 58 artists, including Kenneth Anger, Samuel Beckett, Bruce Conner, Joseph Cornell, Oskar Fischinger, Hollis Frampton, Ernie Gehr, George and Mike Kuchar, and Carolee Schneemann.

The National Film Preservation Foundation is the nonprofit organization created by the U.S. Congress to help save America’s film heritage. Founded in 1996, the NFPF has supported film preservation in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia and has helped save more than 2,166 films and collections. The NFPF is the charitable affiliate of the National Film Preservation Board of the Library of Congress.

Click here for a descriptive list of this year’s grants.

[Above: an excerpt from FF (Julia Murray, 1986)]

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7. PUBLICATIONS AND DVDS

Artist Archives Roger Ebert’s Wikipedia

Artist Archives Roger Ebert’s Wikipedia

Wikipedia administrators suspect that Roger Ebert was a prolific editor of the site. The prominent film critic apparently built a presence on the online encyclopedia as the user “Rebert.” Though his identity was never confirmed, there is strong evidence that it was Ebert: “Rebert” only ever linked to Ebert’s work and his edits demonstrated expansive film knowledge. Ebert himself often praised and referenced Wikipedia in his reviews.

Now, Netherlands-based Australian artist and documentarian Quenton Miller has traced Ebert’s virtual Wiki-tracks and collected all of Ebert’s edits into a single print book. The book isn’t for sale—Miller only made a single copy for himself. But its forty-five pages are full of Ebert’s Wikipedia edits presented opposite the original text.

To Miller, the curious presence of Ebert on Wikipedia and the subsequent changes to Ebert’s revisions are more fascinating than the edits themselves. On Wikipedia, Ebert was just another contributor whose words could eventually be buried under others’. He never re-revised any pages, and quietly stopped making changes in 2009.

The Wikipedia community preserved Ebert’s page as a memorial after his death in 2013 and his edits remain accessible.

For more, see Shirley Li, “Roger Ebert’s Wikipedia,” in The Atlantic.

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Federico Giordano and Bernard Perron, eds., The Archives: Post-Cinema and Video Game Between Memory and the Image of the Present

Federico Giordano and Bernard Perron, eds., The Archives: Post-Cinema and Video Game Between Memory and the Image of the Present

The digital age has witnessed the development of a new kind of archive: immaterial, living and moving, largely user-generated, and conceived for managing a wide variety of audio-visual materials. The first part of The Archives: Post-Cinema and Video Game Between Memory and the Image of the Present (Mimesis Edizioni) investigates the ways in which media forms like web-documentaries, video art and digital art, web series, amateur productions, and also mobile films can be stored and preserved within new digital repositories. The second part focuses on archival and preservation practices of the video game. This approach understands the archive not simply as a “memory box,” but as a fully contemporary practice that locates new media objects in the present and acknowledges their changing cultural and social configurations. The democratic, often immaterial, living, mobile nature of contemporary archives forces us to question whether or not the traditional notion of “the archive” still has a heuristic value, or whether it would be perhaps better to reject any “conventional” idea of archive and embrace the notion of an archive.

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Angela Cartwright and Tom McLaren, Styling the Stars: Treasures from the Twentieth Century Fox Archive

Angela Cartwright and Tom McLaren, Styling the Stars: Treasures from the Twentieth Century Fox Archive

The carefully crafted appearances of the characters personified by Clark Gable, Julie Andrews, and Audrey Hepburn came as the result of meticulous hairstyling, makeup, and costume design. In Hollywood’s world of glamour, continuity photographs ensured that these wardrobe elements remained consistent throughout the filming process. Now, decades later, these shots provide a striking record of the evolution of Hollywood fashion from the 1930s to the early 1970s. Written by Angela Cartwright and Tom McLaren, Styling the Stars: Treasures from the Twentieth Century Fox Archive offers a glimpse into the details of prepping Hollywood’s most iconic personalities and stories about Twentieth Century Fox classics.

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Zoë Druick and Gerta Cammaer, eds., Cinephemera: Archives, Ephemeral Cinema, and New Screen Histories in Canada

Zoë Druick and Gerta Cammaer, eds., Cinephemera: Archives, Ephemeral Cinema, and New Screen Histories in Canada

What do digital platforms mean for cinema studies in Canada? In an era when digital media are proliferating and thousands upon thousands of clips are available online, it seems counter-intuitive to say that audio-visual history is quickly disappearing. But the two processes are actually happening in tandem. Adopting a media-archaeological approach to the history of cinema, contributors to Cinephemera (McGill Queens University Press) cover a wide range of pressing issues relating to Canadian cinema’s ephemerality, including neglected or overlooked histories, the work of found footage filmmakers, questions about access and copyright, and practices of film archiving. Spurred by rapid changes to technologies of production, viewing, and preservation, this collection showcases both leading and emerging scholars grappling with the shifting meaning of cinema as an object of study.

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Dietrich Schüller and Albrecht Häfner, eds., Handling and Storage of Audio and Video Carriers

Dietrich Schüller and Albrecht Häfner, eds., Handling and Storage of Audio and Video Carriers

The latest publication from the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives (IASA), Handling and Storage of Audio and Video Carriers, describes the main recording principles of sound and audiovisual carriers—

mechanical, magnetic, and optical—their components, physical and chemical stability, and their vulnerability. Handling and environmental influences are discussed and recommendations are given for proper storage. The volume contains information about extending the life of the physical carrier and ensuring responsible care for its integrity, and therefore fills a critical need in the complete understanding of managing a collection of sound and audiovisual materials.

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Thai Film Archive Publishes Its First Filmography

Thai Film Archive Publishes Its First Filmography

The Thai Film Archive recently published the first volume of its national filmography. The 637-page book Phabphayontranukrom Hang Chat Chabab Thee 1, or First National Filmography, has been compiled by three generations of film scholars and cinephiles. It brings together information on more than 500 films released between 1927 and 1956.

Chalida Uabumrungjit, the deputy director of the Thai Film Archive, says the publication is important even with the mass of information available online. She points out that film archives around the world continue to regularly put out filmographies, adding that the Hong Kong Film Archive, which was founded just a few years after Thai Film Archive, is about to launch its eighth volume.

Work on the filmography started unofficially in the 1980s when Thai Film Archive director Dome Sukwong was a guest film lecturer at the Bangkok Technical College. Dome asked his students to interview filmmakers and check historical details in newspaper archives. The database project was reinvigorated in 1995 when the
Thai Film Foundation offered financial and administrative support.

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Mack Sennett Collection Contains 50 Slapstick Classics

Mack Sennett Collection Contains 50 Slapstick Classics

A new Blu-ray/DVD set, The Mack Sennett Collection, Volume One, released by Flicker Alley, features fifty newly-restored, digitally-remastered classics, from The Curtain Pole (D. W. Griffith, 1909) to The Fatal Glass of Beer (W. C. Fields, 1933). The films have new musical scores. The DVD collection also includes audio commentaries and Sennett’s 1954 appearance on “This Is Your Life.”

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8. ONLINE RESOURCES

Yale Introduces Digital Archive of FSA Collection

Yale Introduces Digital Archive of FSA Collection

Yale University has launched Photogrammar, a sophisticated web-based platform for organizing, searching, and visualizing the images produced between 1935-1945 as part of the Farm Security Administration—Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) photographic project.

During the Great Depression, FSA-OWI hired photographers to travel across America to document the poverty that gripped the nation, hoping to build support for New Deal programs being championed by F.D.R.’s administration.

Photographers like Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, and Arthur Rothstein took part in what amounted to the largest photography project ever sponsored by the federal government. All told, more than 170,000 photographs were taken and catalogued in Washington, D.C. The Library of Congress became their eventual resting place.

The Photogrammar platform gives you the ability to search through the images by photographer. It also offers an interactive map that lets you gather geographical information about 90,000 photographs in the collection.

There is also a section called Photogrammar Labs where visualization techniques and data experiments are explored.

The Photogrammar project was funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Directed by Laura Wexler, the project was undertaken by Yale’s Public Humanities Program and its Photographic Memory Workshop. You can learn more about the genesis of the project and its technical challenges here and here.

[Above: Wife of Negro Sharecropper, Lee County, Mississippi (Arthur Rothstein, 1935)]

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Collections of the Scottish Screen Available on EFG

Collections of the Scottish Screen Available on EFG

Over 1300 videos from the collections of the Scottish Screen Archive at the National Library of Scotland are now searchable through European Film Gateway. Mostly non-fiction films are available, including documentaries, newsreels, educational material, television, public information films, industrial, advertising, and promotional material. Major collections represented include the Films of Scotland collection, the Scottish Television and Grampian Television collections, and many other unique items that share Scotland’s story in moving images.

For more on this addition to the EFG database, see here.

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University of Arizona Launches Documented Border Project

University of Arizona Launches Documented Border Project

The Documented Border Project from University of Arizona Libraries on Vimeo.

The University of Arizona has launched The Documented Border, an open-access archive and online exhibition of original border-related research material collected and curated by UA faculty along the U.S./Mexico border. The digital archive’s contributors include Celeste González de Bustamante and Jeannine Relly of the Center for Border and Global Journalism and the School of Journalism; Lawrence Gipe of the UA School of Art; and Erika Castaño, a digital archivist with the UA Libraries. Contributions include video, sketches, and more than 35 interviews with journalists and human-rights activists who cover northern Mexico and report under threats of violence. The project was funded by the ConfluenCenter for Creative Inquiry.

More information is available here.

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9.TECHNOLOGY

Kickstarter Project Succeeds, Ferrania to Restart Production

Kickstarter Project Succeeds, Ferrania to Restart Production

Italian film and camera brand Ferrania will restart production of still and moving film formats after a Kickstarter fundraising project reached its target with over two weeks left to run. A company called FILM Ferrania will use the money raised to re-commission and redesign existing machinery from closed sections of the Ferrania factory to begin the manufacture of film. Initial production will be for 35mm and 120 roll formats for stills, and Super 8 and 16mm movie film. The first batch of film, pledged to Kickstarter backers, will be an E6 process transparency film based on the 100 ASA ScotchChrome from the late 1990s, but the company says it wants to go on to produce color negative and black and white emulsions in a wide range of sheet and roll formats.

Ferrania was founded in 1923 and became a well-known film manufacturer as well as a maker of cameras that were very popular in Italy and Europe. Before the film plant closed in 2010, it had been owned by the 3M Corporation and Imation, and had become a major supplier of private brand 35mm and APS films for supermarkets, processing houses, camera stores as well as for films sold as Scotch, Konica, Lomography, Polaroid, and Samsung.

With the original buildings still standing on the factory site, and due to be demolished soon, the new FILM Ferrania project intends to rescue machinery so that film can be made, coated, and cut. The company has already secured one small production line, on which its first batch of slide film will be made.

The Kickstarter project had a goal of $250,000 but with 16 days still to run had reached almost $256,000 with 4,520 backers.

Further details on the project and Ferrania can be found here.

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"Archival News” reports recent news highlights from the media archive community for the Cinema Journal readership. Some information in this column comes courtesy of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) listserv, along with institutional newsletters, websites, and press releases. This column is updated quarterly. Contributions to this column are welcomed. Information should be sent to Katherine Groo, Lecturer, Film and Visual Culture, School of Language and Literature, University of Aberdeen, Taylor Bldg. A, Aberdeen AB24 3UB, Scotland; phone +44 (0)1224-701590; email: k.groo@abdn.ac.uk.

Past issues of Archival News are located here.

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