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Cinema Journal Archival News - 53.1
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Archival News 53.1 (Fall 2013)
Edited by Katherine Groo


1. ACQUISITIONS

V&A Museum Acquires Vivien Leigh Archive

V&A Museum Acquires Vivien Leigh Archive

The Victoria and Albert Museum has acquired an archive of materials from the grandchildren of Vivien Leigh. The archive includes diaries, scrap books, heavily annotated scripts, hundreds of rare early color photographs that Leigh took herself while on tour, and thousands of letters to a wide circle of friends and acquaintances that included the Queen Mother, Graham Greene, and Winston Churchill. These materials encompass her life and work, from her teen years to her death from tuberculosis in 1967 at age 53.

For more details, see The Guardian.

[Above: Photograph by Angus McBean. Harvard Theatre Collection/V&A/PA]

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2. PRESERVATION

Early Orson Welles Film Rediscovered

Early Orson Welles Film Rediscovered

The National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF), George Eastman House, the Cineteca del Friuli, and Cinemazero announced the recovery of Orson Welles’s Too Much Johnson (1938), filmed two years before the American director made Citizen Kane (1941). Never finished, the film did not screen publicly and took on legendary status when the only known print reportedly burned.

Too Much Johnson was originally intended to be screened in conjunction with the Mercury Theatre stage adaptation of an 1894 play by William Gillette. The three-part slapstick film was meant to be shown as prologues to each act of the play with the accompaniment of music and live sound effects. Joseph Cotten was cast in the lead role, with supporting roles going to Mercury Theatre actors, including Eustace Wyatt, Edgar Barrier, Ruth Ford, Arlene Francis, Mary Wickes, Orson Welles, and his wife Virginia Nicolson. The play ultimately opened without the film on August 16, 1938, and flopped.

When discovered, the nitrate print of the film was given by Cinemazero to the Cineteca del Friuli. From there, it was transferred to George Eastman House in order to be preserved with a grant from the National Film Preservation Foundation. The original nitrate print of Too Much Johnson will reside at Eastman House’s Louis B. Mayer Conservation Center, one of the repositories for the museum’s collection of 28,000 films. The bulk of Eastman House’s preservation work for Too Much Johnson was completed at Cinema Arts, a film laboratory in Pennsylvania specializing in the restoration of archival material.

Too Much Johnson had its international premiere at Le Giornate del Cinema Muto, in Pordenone, Italy, on October 9. George Eastman House hosted the U.S. premiere on October 16.

For more information about the film, its discovery, and restoration see here, here, and here.

[Above: Orson Welles directs Too Much Johnson. AMPAS]

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Preservation and Restoration of The March

Preservation and Restoration of The March

The Motion Picture Preservation Lab (MPPL) at the American National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) recently completed its preservation and digital restoration of The March (James Blue, 1964). The film documents the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. It was named to the National Film Registry in 2008 and, that same year, the reels arrived in the lab and preservation processes began. In honor of the fiftieth anniversary of The March for Jobs and Freedom, the lab completed a full digital restoration.

The restored digital theater copy of The March was shown in the McGowan Theater at the National Archives building in Washington, D.C. on August 26, 27, and 28. The March is also available online (linked above).

For further details on the history of this film and the restoration and preservation processes, see Criss Kovac’s account on Media Matters.

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National Film Archive of India Restores Sri Lankan Classic

National Film Archive of India Restores Sri Lankan Classic

After the restoration of Uday Shankar's 1948 film Kalpana in 2012, the National Film Archive of India (NFAI) has once again collaborated with the World Cinema Foundation (WCF). This time, they have come together to restore the Sri Lankan film Nidhanaya (Lester James Peries 1972). The restored print of the movie is going to be screened in the Venezia Classici category at the Venice International Film Festival this year. The restoration work of the film is being done at L'Immagine Ritrovata laboratory in Cineteca Bologna, Italy.

For further details on the project, see the Times of India.

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3. LEGAL

Copyright Conversations with the United Kingdom

Copyright Conversations with the United Kingdom

The US Copyright Office presented a Copyright Matters program on July 29, 2013. The program was entitled "Copyright Conversations with the United Kingdom” and was held in the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

The program featured John Alty, chief executive officer and comptroller general of the Intellectual Property Office of the United Kingdom, as well as Neil Feinson, director of international policy, and Adam Williams, deputy director of international policy. In a conversation with Register of Copyrights Maria A. Pallante and senior officials of the US Copyright Office, the panelists discussed current copyright policy issues facing the United Kingdom and the United States, such as orphan works, extended collective licensing, small claims, and recent efforts in both countries to update the copyright legal system for the digital age.

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Congress Holds Two Hearings on "Innovation in America”

Congress Holds Two Hearings on "Innovation in America”

In July and August, the American Congressional Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet held two hearings on the theme of "Innovation in America.” The first hearing gathered testimony on the role of copyrights; the second gathered testimony on the role of technology in America.

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4. INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANIZATIONS

Emile De Antonio Collection Accessible after Yearlong Project

Emile De Antonio Collection Accessible after Yearlong Project

The Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research recently announced the completion of their year long project to fully process the collection of celebrated American documentary filmmaker Emile de Antonio (1919-1989). Spanning 119 cubic feet, the collection was developed over twenty-seven years, from 1971 to 2008, in 106 separate installments. Funded by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the processing project increases access to the diverse materials within the collection.

Emile de Antonio became involved in filmmaking in the late 1950s as a distributor for Pull My Daisy (Robert Frank and Alfred Leslie, 1959). His first feature film was Point of Order (1964), constructed from kinescopes of the Army-McCarthy hearings. This documentary style—combining newsreel footage, television outtakes, and interviews—marked much of his work, though later films would play with this structure by including reenactments or featuring the filmmaker himself.

The collection reflects de Antonio’s personal and professional life, and includes material on every film project he made and several uncompleted works. It also reflects his role as an advisor, editor, and mentor to many other filmmakers, his participation in leftist political groups, and his research interests in revolutionary movements, the modern art world, and documentary and independent film production.

Retrospective screenings and an online exhibition celebrating Emile de Antonio and the conclusion of the project are scheduled for Fall 2013 and Spring 2014.

For more information on the collection, see here.

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Bradford National Media Museum Becomes Seventh BFI Mediatheque

Bradford National Media Museum Becomes Seventh BFI Mediatheque

Yorkshire’s only British Film Institute (BFI) Mediatheque recently opened at the National Media Museum, Bradford. The BFI Mediatheque is a free facility that allows members of the public instant access to more than 2,500 British film and television programs, drawn from the collections of the BFI National Archive and partner archives, including a selection from the National Media Museum’s TV Heaven collection and the Yorkshire Film Archive.

A collection of material relating to the Yorkshire and Humber area, entitled God’s Own County: Yorkshire on Screen, was unveiled as part of the launch. The collection features one hundred film and television programs from both the BFI National Archive collections and the holdings of the Yorkshire Film Archive. Highlights of God’s Own County include a filmic journey through Victorian Bradford in 1896; a turn-of-the-century Punch and Judy show in Halifax; home movies of Hull’s pioneering aviator Amy Johnson; and feature film depictions of the region, including Billy Liar (John Schlesinger, 1963) and Brassed Off (Mark Herman, 1996).

For more information on the Bradford Mediatheque, see the National Media Museum and BFI.

[Above: Image from Wuthering Heights (Andrea Arnold, 2011), filmed in several North Yorkshire locations]

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European Film Restoration Labs Thrive on Asian Projects

European Film Restoration Labs Thrive on Asian Projects

Italy’s L’Immagine Ritrovata reports that twenty percent of its projects are now Asian, as the region’s film archives and studios have begun to conserve their classics and back catalogs. This year, the laboratory has finished work onManila: In the Claws of Neon (Lino Brocka, 1975), a joint project from Cineteca di Bologna and World Cinema Foundation, and Nobody’s Child (Bu Wancang, 1960), a Hong Kong Film Archive commission that premiered at the city’s international film festival in April. L’Immagine Ritrovata is now working on the Malaysian film Dang Anom (Husain Haniff, 1962), as well as a handful of titles from the region, which have yet to be publicly announced. The demand for expertise in film restoration and preservation has also spurred collaborations between European training programs and Asian museums and universities.

See the Hollywood Reporter for more information.

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AMPAS Announces Major Animation Gift

AMPAS Announces Major Animation Gift

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announces the gift of the Abe and Charlotte Levitow Collection, which features animation art and related production materials that document the career of animator Abe Levitow. Donated by the Levitows’ children, the collection features animation cels, backgrounds, storyboards, graphic art materials and related film prints—hundreds of items that represent Levitow’s work as an artist, animator, and director for Warner Bros., UPA, and MGM. The collection, which will be housed in both the Academy’s Margaret Herrick Library and the Academy Film Archive, is a significant addition to the Academy’s holdings in the field of animation.

All of the production materials may be accessed at the library, which is located in the Academy’s Fairbanks Center for Motion Picture Study in Beverly Hills. Many of the pieces in the Levitow Collection are available for viewing online through the Library’s Production Art Database.

Additional information about Abe Levitow can be found here. Further details on the gift can be found here.

[Above: A Levitow background from Boston Quackie (Robert McKimson, 1957)]

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5. EXHIBITIONS

Long-Lost Mary Pickford Premieres at Keene State College

Long-Lost Mary Pickford Premieres at Keene State College

On October 11, Their First Misunderstanding (Thomas H. Ince and George Loane Tucker, 1911) premiered at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire. The short film stars Mary Pickford in her first credited role. Pickford also wrote the film’s scenario and co-stars with her first husband, Owen Moore. The film was found seven years ago in a decaying barn in the small New Hampshire town of Nelson. The Library of Congress (LoC) funded the restoration project.

For further information on the film’s restoration and exhibition, see LATimes, HuffPo, and KSC News.

[Above: An Associated Press report on the discovery of Their First Misunderstanding, featuring an excerpt from the film]

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MoMA Showcases Newly Restored Masterworks and Rediscoveries

MoMA Showcases Newly Restored Masterworks and Rediscoveries

From October 9 through November 12, the Museum of Modern Art presented "To Save and Project: The 11th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation," an annual festival of newly preserved and restored films from archives, studios, distributors, and independent filmmakers around the world. This year’s festival included more than seventy-five feature films and short subjects from twelve countries, virtually all of them New York or international premieres, and some shown in versions never before seen in the United States. "To Save and Project” is committed to presenting nearly every film in its original celluloid format. Festival co-founder and Associate MoMA curator Joshua Siegel organized the event.

Spanning a wide array of genres, this year’s offerings feature selections by filmmaker Alexander Payne; recent MoMA preservations; a weeklong run of Mikko Niskanen’s Finnish television miniseries Eight Deadly Shots (1972), together with Peter Von Bagh’s documentary portrait The Story of Mikko Niskanen (2010); film noir; animation; a 75th anniversary tribute to the Royal Film Archive of Belgium; and experimental cinema, including several never-before-seen Andy Warhol film shorts from 1963.

For a complete schedule of events, see here.

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Korean War Film Gets First Screening in Six Decades

Korean War Film Gets First Screening in Six Decades

The Street of the Sun (Min Kyoung-sik, 1952) a fiction film shot during the Korean War in Daegu, a southeastern city secured by US and South Korean forces, was screened on the sixty-third anniversary of the start of the war at the Korean Film Archive (KFA). Street of the Sun was thought to have been destroyed or lost, along with thirteen other South Korean films made during the war. However, the director's daughter-in-law, Seong Ryeong-chul, found the 16mm film in a closet at her home two decades ago.

Even after the discovery, well over a decade passed before the KFA became aware of the film. Seong contacted the organization in 2009 and granted the film to the archive in 2012. The audio has never been found.

For more details, see HuffPo.

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NFC Screens Sixth "Little Known Japanese Cinema”

NFC Screens Sixth "Little Known Japanese Cinema”

From October 31 through November 24, the National Film Center (NFC) of Japan hosted "Little Known Japanese Cinema,” the sixth installment of an ongoing series that showcases films from a newly acquired collection of films from several major Japanese studios. The series focuses on films that have become available for screening thanks to preservation work conducted by the NFC.

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"Fassbinder – NOW. Film and Video Art” Opens at Deutsches Filmmuseum

"Fassbinder – NOW. Film and Video Art” Opens at Deutsches Filmmuseum

The exhibition "Fassbinder—Now. Film and Video Art” opened on October 30 at the Deutsches Filmmuseum and will continue until June 1, 2014. "Fassbinder—Now” explores the sustained significance and influence of Rainer Werner Fassbinder by juxtaposing his films against video art by Tom Geens, Runa Islam, Maryam Jafri, Jesper Just, Jeroen de Rijke / Willem de Rooij, and Ming Wong.

In cooperation with the Rainer Werner Fassbinder Foundation, the exhibition includes many original documents from the Rainer Werner Fassbinder Archive, illuminating the director’s work methods. There is an accompanying retrospective in the Filmmuseum’s cinema, as well as a film series that showcases Fassbinder's influence on contemporary cinema, from Pedro Almodóvar to François Ozon.

Further information about the exhibition and the contributing artists can be found at the Deutsches Filmmuseum.

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Tate Screens John Cage and Other Discoveries from CVM

Tate Screens John Cage and Other Discoveries from CVM

In September, the Tate Modern screened two John Cage/Richard Lippold films that were recently restored by the Center for Visual Music (CVM) with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF). The program also includes new restorations of Oskar Fischinger’s early filmsSpirals (1926)andOrnament Sound (1932); rare works by Jordan Belson, including Bopscotch (1952), Quartet(1983) and the premiere of the restoration of the infamousLSD (1962); and Charles Dockum’sMobilcolor Performance (1970), a later color-light projection composition.

The program will be screened at the Hammer Museum/UCLA Film and Television Archive’s Billy Wilder Theatre on December 14.

For a complete program, see here.

[Above: Still from Spirals (Oskar Fischinger, 1926). CVM]

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6. CONFERENCES, SYMPOSIA, AND WORKSHOPS

Indiana University Hosts Orphans Midwest Conference

Indiana University Hosts Orphans Midwest Conference

Indiana University hosted the Orphans Midwest Conference on September 26–28, an event dedicated to all manner of neglected and ephemeral cinematic artifacts. The conference theme was "Materiality and the Moving Image.” Dozens of rare films were screened, along with new works by Bill Morrison, Jennifer Reeves, and Jane Gillooly. The conference was sponsored by the Indiana University Libraries Film Archive, Indiana University Cinema, and New York University Cinema Studies/Tisch School of the Arts.

The complete conference schedule is available here. More information on upcoming Orphans events can be found here.

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Pressing Restart: Community Discussions on Video Game Preservation<

Pressing Restart: Community Discussions on Video Game Preservation

The Association of Moving Image Archivists Student Chapter at New York University hosted "Pressing Restart: Community Discussions on Video Game Preservation” on September 28. Participants at this event examined the many preservation concerns raised by this media format, including hardware obsolescence, emulation software, selection criteria, and contextual information. They also discussed solutions to ensure long-term access to games.Organizers opened the event to archivists, preservationists, and the broader community of game-lovers.

The complete event program can be found here. More information on the event can be found here.

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The Reel Thing XXIX: Los Angeles

The Reel Thing XXIX: Los Angeles

The Reel Thing technical symposium was held on August 21–23 in Los Angeles. The event showcased the latest technologies in audiovisual restoration and preservation and brought together laboratory technicians, archivists, and preservationists for a series of lectures, discussions, and screenings. Grover Crisp and Michael Friend curated the event. All proceeds from The Reel Thing benefit the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA).

More information and a complete program are available here.

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7. AWARDS

NFPF Announces Avant-Garde Masters and Preservation Grants

NFPF Announces Avant-Garde Masters and Preservation Grants

The 2013 Avant-Garde Masters Grants will save a Joseph Cornell film discovered in a box left by the artist and landmark experimental works by four other filmmakers. The grants are awarded by The Film Foundation and the National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF). Sixteen films in total will be preserved and made available through the 2013 grants.

The Avant-Garde Masters Grants program has funded the preservation of significant American avant-garde films for eleven years. The grants have preserved works by fifty-three artists, including Kenneth Anger, Samuel Beckett, Shirley Clarke, Bruce Conner, Oskar Fischinger, Hollis Frampton, Ernie Gehr, George and Mike Kuchar, and Carolee Schneemann.

The NFPF also awarded preservation grants to twenty institutions in thirteen American states. Among the thirty-three films slated for preservation are Climbing Jacob’s Ladder (1987), a documentary exploring the role of African American church museums in preserving history; the final episode of the Boris Karloff serial The King of the Kongo (1929), united with its sound disc for the first time in decades; three silent-era Hollywood shorts (1919); Day of the Dead (1957), an award-winning documentary from the Eames Studio; Escape to Montana’s Glacier Park (ca.1970); avant-garde works by El Paso filmmaker Willie Varela; and 1922 sound-on-film experiments by Joseph Tykociner.

For a full list of preservation grant recipients, see here.

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8. PUBLICATIONS AND DVDS

NDSA Releases 2014 National Agenda for Digital Stewardship

NDSA Releases 2014 National Agenda for Digital Stewardship

The National Digital Stewardship Alliance (NDSA) released the 2014 National Agenda for Digital Stewardship in conjunction with the 2013 Digital Preservation conference. The Agenda integrates the perspective of dozens of experts and hundreds of institutions to provide insight into emerging technological trends, gaps in digital stewardship capacity, and key areas for development. The Agenda is designed to generate comment and conversation over the coming months in order to impact American policies and strategies related to digital preservation and to ensure that digital content of vital importance is acquired, managed, organized, preserved, and accessible.

For more information, see The Signal.

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Dr. Leo Enticknap Film Restoration

Dr. Leo Enticknap Film Restoration

In Film Restoration: The Technology and Culture of Audio-Visual Heritage (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), Leo Enticknap engages with current debates on audio-visual artifacts and identifies the ways in which traditional methods and approaches within film studies, history, and cultural studies fail to provide the tools needed to study and criticize restored films meaningfully. The book also includes a technical glossary of terms related to the processes of film restoration.

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BFI Releases 11th Volume in British Transport Series

BFI Releases 11th Volume in British Transport Series

In August, the British Film Institute (BFI) released Experiment Under London, the eleventh volume in the British Transport DVD collection. This volume marks London Underground's 150th anniversary. It includes five films known collectively as The Victoria Line Reports, which were produced by British Transport Films for London Transport. Made between 1961 and 1969, The Victoria Line Reports document the construction of the Victoria Line from the initial stages of design to its Royal opening.

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9. ONLINE RESOURCES

UVA Library Opens Access to Archive of Historical TV News Footage

UVA Library Opens Access to Archive of Historical TV News Footage

After a five-year effort by to digitally preserve what is believed to be the only surviving TV news archive of original film clips from Virginia’s civil rights era, the University of Virginia Library launched an online collection of historic news footage and anchor scripts from Roanoke’s WSLS-TV. The audiovisual archive includes 20 years of WSLS news stories broadcast from 1951 to 1971. According to a Library of Congress estimate, less than ten percent of local news film from this time period survives.

The WSLS news film collection is available to the public through the library’s online catalog, Virgo.Each news story is searchable by both keywords and controlled subject terms. The collection also can be searched by the dates of the news stories. The first 3,600 news clips of the WSLS-TV News Film Collection are online already at the collection’s Virgo homepage. The rest of the estimated 13,000 clips and 18,000 pages of anchor scripts will be uploaded through the remainder of the year.

An online exhibit page offers another entry point with a smaller selection of news clips and scripts related to the desegregation of public schools, the Cold War, "Scenes of Mid-20th Century America,” and other topics.

Please see UVA Today for further details.

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Lantern and Variety Magazine Arrive at Media History Digital Library

Lantern and Variety Magazine Arrive at Media History Digital Library

In August, David Pierce and Eric Hoyt announced the arrival of Lantern, the search and visualization platform for the Media History Digital Library (MHDL). This new MHDL feature coincided with the addition of the first twenty years of Variety magazine (December 1905–February 1926) to its collections. The MHDL digitizes classic media periodicals that belong in the public domain for full public access. The Lantern project is an open-access co-production of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Communication Arts and the MHDL.

For a complete list of the MHDL’s searchable collections, see here. For more information about the project and its history, see here and here.

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WITNESS Launches Activist’s Guide to Archiving Video

WITNESS Launches Activist’s Guide to Archiving Video

WITNESS recently launched The Activists’ Guide to Archiving Video, a website that provides practical steps for managing, storing, sharing, and preserving digital video. WITNESS is an international non-profit organization dedicated to the use of visual technologies in documenting human rights abuses around the world. The Activists’ Guide was developed for human rights advocates, small media collectives, and activistswho are creating, collecting, or curating video and who want to make sure it survives for future use and access. Developers also hope it will be useful beyond the human rights context, for any small organization that needs to manage digital video and keep it accessible in the long-term.

The Activists’ Guide is available for download here.

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NLM Releases First Public Education Film about Cancer

NLM Releases First Public Education Film about Cancer

In September, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) announced the digital release of The Reward of Courage (1921). Produced by the American Society for the Control of Cancer (later renamed the American Cancer Society) and funded by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, The Reward of Courage pits charlatans who promise cures through the use of quack salves and pastes against the forces of scientific medicine and the US postal authorities. The film calls for the establishment of clinics in industrial workplaces, to promote worker health and higher productivity, and provides what is likely the first representation in film of a breast examination for cancer.

Discovered in the film collections of the Library of Congress (LoC), The Reward of Courage was meticulously restored through cooperation between the NLM and the LoC. The NLM released both the original, silent version of The Reward of Courage and a newly-scored version on Medical Movies on the Web, a curated portal featuring selected motion pictures from the NLM's collection of over 30,000 audiovisual titles. All of the motion pictures featured on Medical Movies on the Web are also available through its Digital Collections.

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10. TECHNOLOGY

Entertainment and Media Industries Drive Demand for Data Storage

Entertainment and Media Industries Drive Demand for Data Storage

According to a recent 179-page report from Coughlin Associates, the professional media and entertainment industries drive the demand for data storage. The Coughlin study looked at every aspect of digital storage, including content capture, post-production, content distribution, and content conversion and preservation. The report includes results from a 2013 survey of Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) and Hollywood Post Alliance (HPA) members on their digital storage needs (comparing the results to similar 2009, 2010, and 2012 surveys).Highlights from the report include:

  1. As image resolution and frame rates increases and as stereoscopic (and other multi-camera) video becomes more common, storage requirements explode.
  2. Several petabytes of storage may be required for a complete stereoscopic digital movie project at 4K resolution. Within 10 years we could see close to an exabyte of content created in a single major movie project.
  3. The greatest storage capacity demand in 2013 was for digital conversion and preservation as well as archiving of new content (about ninety-eight percent).
  4. The development of 4K television and other high-resolution venues in the home and on mobile devices will drive the demand for digital content.
  5. Total media and entertainment storage revenue will grow more than ninety percent between 2013 and 2018 (from $6.2 billion to $11.9 billion)
  6. Over ninety-nine exabytes of digital storage will be used for digital archiving and content conversion and preservation by 2018.
  7. Silver halide film as a content distribution media will vanish before the end of the decade.

For further details on the report, see Forbes magazine. The Coughlin report can be found here.

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America’s First Bookless Library Opens in Bexar, Texas

America’s First Bookless Library Opens in Bexar, Texas

In September, the Bexar County Digital Library, also known as BiblioTech, opened to the public. The $2.4 million, 4,000-square-foot space is located on the south side of San Antonio, Texas. The library is stocked with 10,000 e-books, 500 e-readers, 48 computers, and 20 iPads and laptops. It will have no printed material. The library was developed in response to explosive population growth around the city.

Bibliotech joins several academic libraries that have already made the transition to entirely digital collections or are in the process of doing so, including the engineering library at the University of Texas San Antonio and the library at Imperial College London.

For further reading on the Bibliotech, see BBC and Time Magazine.

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Silent Film Returns to Northeastern US

Silent Film Returns to Northeastern US

In August, the New York Times reported: "Modern technology is turning some of the strip malls and storage sheds of New Jersey and New York into silent-movie shrines. With help from the Web, fans of those films can hike along parking lots, weedy streambeds and gritty alleys where early screen actors posed as American Indians, Confederate soldiers, Soviet spies, Dickens characters and escaped convicts.”

For more information on this silent cinema culture, see here.

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"Archival News” reports recent news highlights from the media archive community for the Cinema Journal readership. Some information in this column comes courtesy of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) listserv, along with institutional newsletters, websites, and press releases. This column is updated quarterly. Contributions to this column are welcomed. Information should be sent to Katherine Groo, Lecturer, Film and Visual Culture, School of Language and Literature, University of Aberdeen, Taylor Bldg. A, Aberdeen AB24 3UB, Scotland; phone +44 (0)1224-701590; email: k.groo@abdn.ac.uk.

Past issues of Archival News are located here.

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