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Cinema Journal Archival News 55.2
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Archival News 55.2 (Winter 2016)
Edited by Katherine Groo



1. ACQUISITIONS

Eastman Acquires Largest Collection of Contemporary Indian Cinema

Eastman Acquires Largest Collection of Contemporary Indian Cinema

In November, the George Eastman Museum announced its acquisition of the world’s largest collection of contemporary Indian cinema held by a museum or film archive. The collection consists of 775 prints representing 597 film titles made between 1999 and 2013, all in 35mm format. The acquisition also includes 6,000 film posters.

This donation includes films not only from the Hindi-language film industry commonly known as “Bollywood,” but also Malayalam, Punjabi, Tamil, and Telugu productions. The languages represented in these films include Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Punjabi, Tamil, Telugu, and Urdu. Many titles are from acclaimed directors of Indian cinema, such as Mani Ratnam, Ashutosh Gowariker, Anurag Kashyap, Nagesh Kukunoor, and Sanjay Leela Bhansali.

In late 2014, this collection of Indian films was discovered in an abandoned multiplex in California. The prints had been shipped from India for release in specialized theaters in the United States. Unable to convert to digital projection, the multiplex abruptly closed in August 2013, and all of the release prints, posters, and projection equipment were left behind. Dino Everett, archivist of the Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive at the University of Southern California, School of Cinematic Arts, alerted the Eastman Museum to the collection. If the Eastman Museum had not taken ownership of the material and provided an appropriate environment for preserving the collection, the films and the corresponding posters—plus a wide array of related audio recordings—would have been destroyed when the multiplex was razed earlier this year.

For further details, see here.

[Above: Om Shanti Om (Farah Khan, 2007); George Eastman Museum)

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Ira Deutchman Donates Collection to University of Michigan

Ira Deutchman Donates Collection to University of Michigan

Film producer Ira Deutchman announced in December that he would donate his personal archive to the University of Michigan’s Screen Arts Mavericks & Makers collection.

As founder of Cinecom and Fine Line Features, Deutchman has produced more than 150 films, including Matewan (John Sayles, 1987), Sex, Lies, and Videotape (Steven Soderbergh, 1989), and The Player (Robert Altman, 1992). In addition to being a film studies professor at Columbia University School of the Arts, Deutchman works as an independent producer and consultant in independent film marketing and production. In a statement, Deutchman said he believes his contribution will add depth to the study of the independent film industry.

His donation will include personal documents, e-mails, photographs, festival catalogues, posters, and memorabilia from art house exhibits dating back to the early 1970s. Museum officials are currently working to catalogue the collection, with the goal of having it ready for a June 2017 symposium and exhibition.

More information on the acquisition can be found here.

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Time Inc. Donates Archive to NY Historical Society

Time Inc. Donates Archive to NY Historical Society

In November, the New York Times reported that Time Inc. had recently donated its vast archive to the New-York Historical Society. The archive includes an array of American memorabilia: a 1937 Oscar; a globe of the Earth, wrapped in 1988 by the artist Christo; a receipt for a three-month gift subscription to Time for the fifteen-year-old John F. Kennedy; and Life’s carbon copy of an ad hoc contract signed 23 November 1963 by Abraham Zapruder, granting the magazine exclusive worldwide print rights “to my original 8mm color film which shows the shooting of President Kennedy in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.”

The archive traces the history of multiple publications and media institutions, including Time, Life, Fortune, Sports Illustrated, and People, as well as the “March of Time” radio and newsreel series. More than seven million historical documents and artifacts will be warehoused temporarily. The boxes will return to Manhattan to be organized, cataloged, curated and, in some cases, displayed at the historical society. The process is expected to take five years. It will be financed with a two million dollar grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

See the NYTimes for more on the donation; a photographic tour of some of Time Inc.’s collection is available here.

[Above: A copy of the Zapruder film; Photo by Sam Hodgson of the NYTimes]

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2. PRESERVATION AND RESTORATION

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Discovered at the BFI

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Discovered at the BFI

The BFI National Archive and Walt Disney Animation Studios recently announced the rediscovery of a rare, long-lost, Walt Disney animated film, Sleigh Bells (1928) featuring the first-ever Disney character, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, a long-eared precursor to Mickey Mouse. 

Walt Disney invented Oswald the Lucky Rabbit in 1927. While several other Oswald films survive, Sleigh Bells had been considered a lost film, unseen since its original release. The animation in the film was accomplished by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks, both of whom went on to create the character of Mickey Mouse, following a contractual disagreement with Universal, for whom they had created the Oswald films.

The rediscovery was made by a researcher at the BFI while browsing the online catalogue of the Archive’s holdings. Walt Disney Animation Studios have taken the unique surviving film print and created both a new preservation print and digital copies. The film has a running time of approximately six minutes.

 

The BFI press release, along with a sample of the digitized preservation print, can be found here.

 

[Above: Sleigh Bells (Walt Disney, 1928)]

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Chennai Lab to Restore 600 Egyptian Films

Chennai Lab to Restore 600 Egyptian Films

 

Prasad Studios, a Chennai-based laboratory (in eastern India) will undertake the task of restoring more than 600 Egyptian films dating from the 1920s to the turn of the last century from the film library of Rotana, a pan-Arab media company. A twelve-member team has set up temporary headquarters in the Egyptian capital to scan and digitize the films before they are restored in Chennai. Egyptian laws do not allow original prints to be taken out of the country.

At a seminar on Film Restoration and Film Heritage Policies organized by the Cairo film festival, the head and technical director of Rotana, Tarek Gabali, stated, “A substantial share of the national cinematic heritage of Egypt is lying in ruins.” According to Gabali, Rotana has invested fifteen million dollars in the three-year restoration project. 110 films have already been restored since work began in January 2015. Rotana also plans to digitize 1,700 films, ninety percent of them Egyptian, by the end of 2016.

Read more about the restoration project here.

 

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Twenty-Five Films Added to the American National Film Registry

Twenty-Five Films Added to the American National Film Registry

 

In December, the Librarian of Congress’s acting librarian, David Mao, announced the annual selection of motion pictures to join the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Spanning the period 1894–1997, the films named to the registry include Hollywood classics, documentaries, animation, silent films, independent, and experimental motion pictures. This year’s selections bring the number of films in the registry to 675, a small part of the Library’s vast moving-image collection of 1.2 million items.

The 2015 registry list includes L.A. Confidential (Curtis Hanson, 1997), Top Gun (Tony Scott, 1986), Imitation of Life (Douglas Sirk, 1959), and Ghostbusters (Ivan Reitman, 1984). The list also includes Portrait of Jason (Shirley Clarke, 1967), an exploration of a gay hustler’s life in his own words; Su Friedrich’s 1990 autobiographical tale about the schism between a daughter and her father, Sink or Swim; and The Story of Menstruation, a 1946 Disney-produced film seen by nearly 93 million women and girls over two decades.

The silent films tapped for preservation are A Fool There Was (Frank Powell, 1915), starring one of cinema’s first vamps, Theda Bara; Douglas Fairbanks’s 1920 swashbuckler The Mark of Zorro; and Humoresque (Frank Borzage), the 1920 story of the rise of a Jewish immigrant to violin virtuoso. Another addition to the list is the Spanish-language version of Dracula from 1931, which was shot concurrently with the English-speaking film starring Bela Lugosi.

Under the terms of the National Film Preservation Act, each year the Librarian of Congress names twenty-five films to the National Film Registry that are “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant. The films must be at least ten years old. The Librarian makes the annual registry selections after reviewing hundreds of titles nominated by the public and conferring with Library film curators and the distinguished members of the National Film Preservation Board (NFPB). The public is urged to make nominations for next year’s registry at the NFPB’s website.

 

For each title named to the registry, the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation works to ensure that the film is preserved for future generations, either through the Library’s motion-picture preservation program or through collaborative ventures with other archives, motion-picture studios, and independent filmmakers.

 

[Above: Portrait of Jason (Shirley Clarke, 1967)]

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Abel Gance’s Epic ‘Napoleon’ Restored and Re-Released

Abel Gance’s Epic ‘Napoleon’ Restored and Re-Released

 

 

In January, the BFI announced the culmination of a multi-decade restoration of Abel Gance’s epic film Napoleon (1927), led by film historian Kevin Brownlow.

The five-and-a-half hour film was first presented, partially restored, at the BFI London Film Festival in 1980. The latest digital restoration will have its premiere screening with a live performance by the Philharmonia Orchestra of an original score by Carl Davis (the longest ever composed for a silent film) in early November 2016 at the Royal Festival Hall. The project was completed with contributions from several partners and archives, including the Cinémathèque Française and the Centre Nationale de la Cinématographie in Paris.

The new version of Napoleon will allow audiences to see the film’s original tinting and toning. The film has been re-graded and received extensive digital clean up throughout. It will also be the most complete version of the film available. Brownlow spent fifty years compiling footage from surviving prints held by archives all over the world. 

Following the premiere of the digital restoration, Napoleon will be released in cinemas UK-wide in its music-synched version and on Blu-ray/DVD. More information on Gance’s film, the restoration work, and the release can be found here.

[Above: Napoleon (Abel Gance, 1927)]

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National Film Archive of India Launches Digitization Project

National Film Archive of India Launches Digitization Project

 

The National Film Archive of India (NFAI) has launched a project to digitize one thousand feature films and one thousand short films, according to Prakash Magdum, director of the NFAI. Among the first titles to be digitized will be four Bengali films by Rituparno Ghosh. Original negatives of Ghosh’s films were recently discovered in Kolkata and donated to the NFAI. 

“We are looking at all possible sources of films for the project and more original negatives…Even damaged and burnt negatives are welcome since we now have the technology to restore them and make them fit for screening. While we are digitizing these films, we also have the facility to restore and preserve celluloid negatives. In the course of the next few months, we hope to receive more prints from Kolkata. A sizeable number of Bengali films are sure to be among the thousand which will be digitized, though it is too early to identify them,” said Magdum, who addressed a seminar at the Kolkata International Film Festival.

A two-member committee has been appointed to draw up a list of the films to be digitized. It will prioritize the films by historical significance, director, year of production, and availability.

Further details are available here and here.

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Gaumont, CNC Complete Restoration of Fantômas

Gaumont, CNC Complete Restoration of Fantômas

A 4K restoration of Louis Feuillade’s landmark crime serial, Fantômas (1913–1914), has been completed by Gaumont and the Centre National du Cinéma, in collaboration with the Cinémathèque Française, to celebrate the films’ 100th anniversary. Kino Lorber released the restoration on Blu-ray in January. 

Based on the French pulp novellas by Marcel Allain and Pierre Souvestre, Fantômas stars René Nacarre as the “assassin in black,” pursued over the course of five features by the indefatigable Inspector Juve (Edmund Bréon) and his friend, journalist Jérôme Fandor (Georges Melchior). Feuillade is well-known for his experimentations in long-form cinema; his other serials include Les Vampires (1915) and Judex (1916).    

For more on the restoration and release, see here.

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CCM to Digitize 100 Years of Moroccan Cinema

CCM to Digitize 100 Years of Moroccan Cinema

The Moroccan Cinematographic Center (CCM) recently announced that one hundred years’ worth of Moroccan moving-image artifacts will be digitized. CCM’s digitization project will start with twenty feature films, seventy documentaries, and one hundred television news reports. Both negative- and positive-type 35mm and 16mm film archives will be digitized and split into 100-minute units.

The initiative to digitize these archives dates back to October 2012, when the National Forum on Cinema recommended digital conversion to the CCM Board of Directors, who decided to take on the project in 2014. The digitization will take place at the Moroccan Cinematographic Center’s headquarters. The project’s main objective is to protect Morocco’s moving-image heritage. The first phase includes the digitization of files from the first decades of the twentieth century (1905–1940).

Further details are available here.

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3. COPYRIGHT AND LEGAL ISSUES

Goodlatte Convenes Copyright Roundtables at Santa Clara, UCLA

Goodlatte Convenes Copyright Roundtables at Santa Clara, UCLA

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.), along with other Members of the Judiciary Committee, held roundtable discussions of United States copyright law at Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, California, and at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). These discussions, which are part of the Committee’s copyright review, included a wide range of creators, innovators, technology professionals, and users of copyrighted works.

Chairman Goodlatte first announced the Judiciary Committee’s intention to undertake a comprehensive review of U.S. copyright law on 24 April 2013, in a speech before the World Intellectual Property Day celebration at the Library of Congress. As part of the copyright review, the House Judiciary Committee has held twenty hearings, which included testimony from more than one hundred witnesses. More information on the House Judiciary Committee’s comprehensive copyright review can be found here.  

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YouTube Offers Financial, Legal Support to Fight Copyright Claims

YouTube Offers Financial, Legal Support to Fight Copyright Claims

YouTube recently announced a new program to help users fight back against outrageous copyright threats. The company has created a “Fair Use Protection” program that will cover legal costs of users who, in the company’s view, have been unfairly targeted for takedown. When the company notices that a video targeted for takedown is clearly a lawful fair use, it may choose to offer the user the option of enrolling their video into the program. If the user decides to join, the video will stay up in the United States and, if the rightsholder sues, YouTube will provide assistance of up to one million dollars in legal fees.

YouTube has started the program off with four videos that the company believes represent fair use. You can watch them here. You can also read more about the program on Google’s blog and at the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

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4. INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANIZATIONS

New BAMPFA Building Opens

New BAMPFA Building Opens

In January, the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA) opened in its new location, an 83,000-square-foot site in Berkeley’s Arts District. The new building was designed by New York-based Diller Scofidio + Renfro. BAMPFA now houses exhibition galleries, two film theaters, a performance forum, a café, four study centers for art and film, a reading room, and an art-making lab. The building also features a large, outdoor LED screen and viewing area for public screenings.

The opening exhibition, “Architecture of Life”, will explore how architecture—as concept, metaphor, and practice—illuminates aspects of our lived experience. Occupying all of the gallery spaces in the new building, the exhibition will present an international selection of over two hundred works of art, architectural drawings and models, and scientific illustrations made over the past two thousand years.

In BAMPFA’s new film theater, international and local filmmakers, critics, special guests, and experts on film will share their love of the movies in the series Cinema Mon Amour.

Further details on the building’s design can be found here. Programming information is here.

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Bulgarian National Film Archive Joins Funding Protests

Bulgarian National Film Archive Joins Funding Protests

In November, the staff of the Bulgarian National Film Archive (BNFA) joined the protests against underfunding of the country’s cultural sector. Over 3,000 employees of libraries, museums and galleries are demanding additional government funding of 10 million Euros and a fifty percent increase in salaries. The national movement is supported by the country’s two most important labor organizations: the Confederation of Independent Trade Unions and the Confederation of Labor “Podkrepa.” The demonstrations were held in various locations across the country throughout the month of December.

Antonia Kovacheva, director of the BNFA, stated that, “the annual budget of the BNFA, a state institution with unique cultural value, is less than 200,000 EUR with a 40% share coming from its own revenues.” She added, “Our institution stores 99% from the country’s film heritage, possesses eight locations and has three film depositories. Unfortunately, most of them are in a very poor condition. The extremely low salaries do not contribute to the attraction of young people to the BNFA. We permanently suffer from a serious deficit of staff specialized both in film processing and new digital technologies.”

Read more about the protests here.

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NFB Welcomes Refugees to Canada

NFB Welcomes Refugees to Canada

In December, the Canadian government began welcoming refugees from Syria. Upon arrival, they were provided with permanent resident status and a social insurance number, as well as welcome kits that include a Parks Canada tuque, children’s books, a copy of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and a National Film Board of Canada DVD, amongst other items.

The NFB DVD features a dozen short films and is designed to offer Syrian refugees a taste of Canada’s diverse cultures and stories. The short films were chosen for their ability to inspire, excite and comfort—without relying on words.

The complete list of selected titles can be found here, as well as several short films with words that were prepared for two further DVDs.

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5. EXHIBITIONS

MoMA Hosts ‘To Save and Project’

MoMA Hosts ‘To Save and Project’

In November, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) hosted the thirteenth annual edition of “To Save and Project,” an international festival of newly preserved and restored films from archives, studios, distributors, foundations, and independent filmmakers. This year’s festival included seventy-five newly restored features and shorts from sixteen countries—nearly all of them New York or North American premieres—by Chantal Akerman, Dario Argento, Samuel Fuller, and Yasujirô Ozu, among many others. A variety of rare films were presented as well, from pioneering European feminist films, including a director’s cut of Helma Sanders-Brahms’s Germany, Pale Mother (1980), to rediscoveries from Iran, Morocco, and the Philippines; from long-lost silent comedies starring Clara Bow, Stan Laurel, and Oliver Hardy to extended original Italian releases of classics by Federico Fellini, Dario Argento, and Dino Risi.

Guest presenters included Guy Maddin, Abderrahmane Sissako, and noted film historians John Canemaker, Tom Gunning, and Eddie Muller. In memory of Chantal Akerman, Babette Mangolte, the cinematographer of Jeanne Dielman (1976), introduced a special screening of the film and offered a remembrance.

A complete schedule of events can be found here.

[Above: Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (Chantal Akerman, 1976)] 

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Black Salt Collective Launches ‘Infinite Archives’ at SOMArts

Black Salt Collective Launches ‘Infinite Archives’ at SOMArts

In January, the Black Salt Collective opened their exhibition, “Visions into Infinite Archives” in the main gallery at SOMArts in San Francisco. The show includes paintings, murals, video installations, textiles, sculpture, and performance work by thirty artists of color, including the collaborative and individual work by Black Salt Collective members Sarah Biscarra-Dilley, Grace Rosario PerkinsAnna Luisa Petrisko, and Adee Roberson.

According to the show’s organizers, “The exhibition…honors the non-linearity of time and creates an interactive and infinite archive of universal depths. The exhibition not only imagines a future that challenges dominant histories and present moments of cyclical and institutional oppression, it births a universe where ancestral dreams and the hopes of descendants live and interact—a universe with alternative futures and alternative pasts, where oracles become realities, where histories are honored and where healing can take place.”

The show continues through February; a complete program and further details can be found here.

[Above: Still from “Let Me Be The One: A History of a Decolonized Service,” Jeepneys + some times, photo by Nastya Valentine]

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Cinémathèque Française Hosts ‘Toute la mémoire du monde’

Cinémathèque Française Hosts ‘Toute la mémoire du monde’

Toute la mémoire du monde, 4ème édition - Du 3 au 7 février 2016 from La Cinémathèque française on Vimeo.

On February 3–7, the Cinémathèque Française hosted its fourth annual festival of film restoration—“Toute la mémoire du monde”—in collaboration with several partners, including the Fondation Jérôme Seydoux-Pathé. Each year, the festival invites the public to discover the restoration and preservation work undertaken by laboratories and archives worldwide. This year’s festival featured the restoration of the first films of Chantal Akerman; the World Cinema Foundation’s restoration of several works by foundational Filipino director Lino Brocka; and Milestone’s restoration of Losing Ground (1982), the second film by African-American director Kathleen Collins.

This year’s festival took place in more sites across the city than previous editions. Screenings were held in Les Fauvettes (Gobelins), the Jérôme Seydoux-Pathé Foundation and Christine 21 (Latin Quarter). A total of six screening rooms were involved. More than one hundred sessions were offered over five days with numerous guests: filmmakers, actors, critics, and specialists in film restoration.

A complete program can be found here.

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6. CONFERENCES, SYMPOSIA, AND WORKSHOPS

AMIA Holds Annual Conference

AMIA Holds Annual Conference

The Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) held its annual conference in Los Angeles on November 18–21. As part of the conference, representatives from studios, universities, national and regional archives, libraries, and museums present case studies and workshops. This year, experts from the Academy Film Archive and George Eastman Museum traced the journey of a hypothetical collection from arrival at the repository to assessment, inventory, de-accession, and disposal; Paramount Pictures offered an overview of their archiving practices, including how they assess the condition of their collections, developed the process of prioritization, and established principles for digital preservation; and the British Film Institute reviewed its on-going project to digitize 10,000 films in partnership with UK Regional and National archives and rights holders. The conference also featured workshops on copyright; community archiving; cataloguing and metadata; and the environmental impact of preservation.

A full program can be found here.

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NFAI, FIAF Host Film Preservation Workshop in Pune

NFAI, FIAF Host Film Preservation Workshop in Pune

Following on the success of the Film Restoration and Preservation School in Mumbai in February 2015, the Film Heritage Foundation and FIAF will collaborate with the National Film Archive of India to offer a ten-day training program in film preservation and restoration in Pune at the end of February 2016. Government officials in India announced the workshop at a press conference during the International Film Festival of India in Goa on 22 November 2015.

The course is being specially customized by the FIAF Technical Commission for Indian requirements and conditions, and will be certified by FIAF. The workshop will focus on practical training in current film preservation and restoration techniques and archival practices conducted by leading archivists and restorers from preeminent international institutions. Further details on the program can be found here and here.

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First LoC Radio Preservation Task Force Conference

First LoC Radio Preservation Task Force Conference

In February, the Library of Congress’s (LoC) Radio Preservation Task Force (RPTF) will hold its first national media history conference in Washington D.C. with speakers from over eighty universities, along with representatives from NPR, Pacifica Radio, multiple Smithsonian Institutions, and the Library of Congress.

The RPTF is the largest working digital humanities initiative in Film and Media studies with over 150 Research Associates and 350 participating archives and museums. The focus of the RPTF is noncommercial media and localism; the organization is working to define the contours of “nontheatrical sound studies” within the emerging discipline of sound studies. Over the coming years, the RTPF also will be building a metadata interface with educational materials and fair use recordings and identifying safe “shelf” space for endangered materials at multiple state and college archives.

Further details and a complete conference schedule can be found here and here.

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7. ONLINE RESOURCES AND NEW TECHNOLOGY

New York Public Library Launches Digital Archive, Encourages Reuse

New York Public Library Launches Digital Archive, Encourages Reuse

In January, the New York Public Library released more than 180,000 photographs, postcards, maps, and other public-domain items from the library’s special collections in downloadable high-resolution files—along with an invitation to users to download them and do with them whatever they please.

“We see digitization as a starting point, not end point,” said Ben Vershbow, the director of NYPL Labs, the in-house technology division that spearheaded the effort. “We don’t just want to put stuff online and say, ‘Here it is,’ but rev the engines and encourage reuse.”

Most items in the public-domain release have already been visible at the library’s digital collections portal. The difference is that the highest-quality files will now be available for free and immediate download, along with the programming interfaces, known as APIs, that allow developers to use them more easily.

Read more at the New York Times.

[Above: Covers of the Green Book, a guidebook published from 1936 to 1966 that listed hotels, restaurants and other establishments across the country that welcomed African-Americans. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Jean Blackwell Hutson Research and Reference Division, The New York Public Library]

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Ngā Taonga Launches New Online Archive

Ngā Taonga Launches New Online Archive

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision, New Zealand’s moving image and sound archive, recently launched a new online archive, which unites digital sound and image files from the former New Zealand Film Archive and Radio New Zealand catalogues. Ngā Taonga plans to add the Television NZ archive, an online education program, and more interactive features in the future. The new site and more information can be found here.

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Kodak Brings Back Super 8

Kodak Brings Back Super 8

At the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Kodak kicked off its Super 8 Revival Initiative with a display of an early prototype of a new Kodak Super 8 camera that combines the features of the classic Super 8 with digital functionality. Despite the current predominance of digital formats in photography, Kodak is aiming to capitalize on what it calls the “analogue renaissance.” Swiss designer Yves Béhar has taken a lead role in the creation of the new camera.

The original Super 8 camera launched in 1965 and helped revolutionize home movies by operating with an easily-loaded film cartridge and the capability to record sound on the same film strip. The new Super 8 is not entirely devoted to celluloid: anyone sending their footage to Kodak for processing will also receive a digital copy of their film. The camera, which is expected to be available later this year, is likely to be sold for $400-$750.

Read the press release from Kodak and more from the Guardian.

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"Archival News” reports recent news highlights from the media archive community for the Cinema Journal readership. Some information in this column comes courtesy of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) listserv, along with institutional newsletters, websites, and press releases. This column is updated quarterly. Contributions to this column are welcomed. Information should be sent to Katherine Groo, Lecturer, Film and Visual Culture, School of Language and Literature, University of Aberdeen, Taylor Bldg. A, Aberdeen AB24 3UB, Scotland; phone +44 (0)1224-701590; email: k.groo@abdn.ac.uk.

Past issues of Archival News are located here.

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